Raising Chaos

WITH the year barely under way, preparations are revving up for Chaos 2013.

Pop rock group Evarane is one of the headline acts scheduled to play on Friday 12 July.
Pop rock group Evarane is one of the headline acts scheduled to play on Friday 12 July.

WITH the year barely under way, preparations are revving up for Chaos 2013.

Billed as the ‘only truly independent music festival’, this year’s three-day biker event looks set to top previous years in terms of roster.

Chris Chadwick, one of the festival organisers, said Chaos remains faithful to its ethos of bikes, bands, beer and no bullsh*t. The event kicks off on Friday 12 July, through to the Sunday at 10pm. Situated once again at what must be the most envious of festival locations, Pleinmont Point, it promises a great line-up with a rethink that sees only one main stage.

Bands confirmed on the bill so far include the UK’s Evarane, Charred Hearts, a return to Chaos for ska/punk band [spunge] and the last-ever gig for local rock behemoths Big Machine, with the organisers hinting that ‘negotiations are under way to bring over a top headline act never before seen in Guernsey’.

Evarane, who were at Rock Of Ages last year, are playing on the Friday night.

Since their last appearance in the island the band have supported Funeral for a Friend and Mallory Knox.

The Saturday night will include Big Machine’s final gig. The band have just announced their farewell ‘tour’. A staple on the Chaos stage for the past three years, the organisers felt it

fitting that the band played their swansong at the festival.

This year Chaos has chosen to feature a single main stage. Chris explained that this was done so they could concentrate on getting bigger headline acts.

‘We are putting all our resources into having the very best bands, sound and light on that stage. This is necessary for the calibre of bands we are trying to attract to play at Chaos.

‘This stage will be inside our massive big top tent, so weather is not an issue. If it rains everyone can fit under cover, and if it’s sunny we can just drop the walls and have shade.

The move, he said, was also in response to comments the organisers had been getting over the last two years that people were missing ‘really good bands because they were watching another really good band on the other stage’.

This has made the Peace Tent a genuine alternative stage, without losing any of its intimacy or quirkiness, said Chris.

‘There are acts now in the Peace Tent that only a few years ago could have headlined one of the other stages.’