Pop-up shop's timing perfect for rebranded Go

A REBRANDED charity had a week to raise its profile in Town with the use of a pop-up shop.

Matt Warren, workshop manager for rebranded charity Go, outside the pop-up shop in Smith Street which it has the use of for a week thanks to OSA Recruitment. (Picture by Adrian Miller, 1286972)
Matt Warren, workshop manager for rebranded charity Go, outside the pop-up shop in Smith Street which it has the use of for a week thanks to OSA Recruitment. (Picture by Adrian Miller, 1286972)

A REBRANDED charity had a week to raise its profile in Town with the use of a pop-up shop.

Go – formerly Communicate – was the first of four charities to have use of a retail outlet belonging to OSA Recruitment in Smith Street in the run-up to Christmas.

Go is short for Giving Opportunities, and it helps people with communication difficulties find meaningful employment.

As well as a charity shop on The Bridge, it has a workshop at Bordeaux where it ‘breathes new life into old furniture’ either to sell or on commission.

Go works primarily with people from school leaving age up to the age of about 25.

Comments for: "Pop-up shop's timing perfect for rebranded Go"

pb falla

More nonsense

really

Great idea for a use of one of the many empty shops. Shame about the prices this charity shop, and all charity shops seem to sell there furniture for.

£175 for a 5 drawer dessing table, that was given to them for free doesnt really seem like charity shop prices to me, even with a lick of paint and a light sand a la shabby chic

Peter

A sofa given free to a certain charity shop on sale for £49. A woman on social security with a handicapped child liked the sofa and offered the sales woman all the money in her purse £40, the charity shop refused to sell the sofa so she went out disappointed. A week later the same sofa was in the rain ready to be collected its place in the shop had been taken by one in better condition. Having seen this, makes me reluctant to give to a charity shop.

Surely the time has now come to make these businesses pay income tax as they are no longer serving a useful purpose by looking after the poor.

Watcher

Sorry Peter, a charity shop exists to raise as much money as possible for the people or cause they support. Their role is not to look after the poor, that is what the States of Guernsey is supposed to be doing. The fact that there are still people who are considered to be poor suggests the States is not succeeding.