Pension gripes are a year too late

A STATEMENT yesterday from the Association of States Employee Organisations on pension reforms was notable for who, or more importantly who didn’t, sign it off.

A STATEMENT yesterday from the Association of States Employee Organisations on pension reforms was notable for who, or more importantly who didn’t, sign it off.

You would expect a statement of that importance – demanding negotiations ‘begin’ more than a year after they actually started – would have been issued by the man at the top.

But while Prospect and Unite have dismissed as unacceptable proposals released by the joint working group on pensions, the chairman of ASEO finds himself in an unenviable position.

He was among the seven-man working group that agreed the new scheme and went on record saying the proposed deal was the best employees could have hoped for.

Since then, he has faced a backlash from union colleagues unhappy with the negotiated changes and demanding negotiations start again.

Is that likely? About as likely as the private sector reintroducing final salary pensions.

Do other union officials have a right to feel aggrieved? No, they were all part of it.

The ASEO exists to represent the interests of 12 unions active in Guernsey.

Its chairman, along with another member, was on the working group – they also brought in a pensions expert from Prospect to form the employee negotiating ‘team’.

By all accounts they battled tooth and nail with the employer’s side, gaining several victories along the way.

They did what they were supposed to do, representing the interests of the near 5,000 staff who make up the various unions of the ASEO.

But now they’re now in a tough spot, with union colleagues staging a virtual coup because the result didn’t go the way an out-of-touch section of the public sector wanted (anything other than the status quo was unacceptable).

Islanders are wise to tactics employed by union officials and would have been none too impressed by the immediate threats of industrial action.

Tweaks could still be made to the new scheme if the Pensions Consultative Committee, which includes five union officials, backs down – but deputies will have the final say.

Unions angry at the process are a year too late to the party.

Comments for: "Pension gripes are a year too late"

kevin

How could the unions and the ASEO represent the interests of nearly 5000 public sector staff when they never bothered to ask the staff for any feedback or gave them any information during the negotiations?

Very badly handled indeed.

Quizzed

Kev I agree.

The Press are reporting on the talk about Unions being a year late!

I would like the Press and everyone to know that as far as I know, the Unions were not involved. I would like to hear from anyone that KNOWS what unions WERE involved during talks in 2012.

So as the Press reports re the ASEO:

They did what they were supposed to do, representing the interests of the near 5,000 staff who make up the various unions of the ASEO.

But now they’re now in a tough spot, with union colleagues staging a virtual coup because the result didn’t go the way an out-of-touch section of the public sector wanted (anything other than the status quo was unacceptable).

Look, the fact is Ed and the gang did enter talks and as far as the remuneration people were concerned, they'd agreed to the terms on behalf of the workers.

THEY DID NOT HAVE THE MANDATE TO DO THAT

So they didn't do what they were supposed to do did they 'Guernsey Press'. Pity them in a tough spot eh! Bless them. Report the facts!

Transparency is all we want. No walking out, or refusing to do jobs! Transparency. The talks should have involved us in the first place. Then these headlines would not have existed!!!