‘Don’t store up trouble, get yourself looked at’

KEEPING a dedicated Covid unit is no longer needed at the Princess Elizabeth Hospital, but beds can become available ‘at the snap of a finger’.

Medical director Dr Peter Rabey said that Brock Ward at the hospital was back to normal use, but a unit could be reinstated for Covid at the snap of a finger.
Medical director Dr Peter Rabey said that Brock Ward at the hospital was back to normal use, but a unit could be reinstated for Covid at the snap of a finger.

Islanders were urged not to put off seeing their doctor or attending the Emergency Department if required.

Backlogs in operations are still expected due to safety precautions, but now that the Brock Ward and day patient unit have returned to business as usual this will help to get back on track.

‘We’ve got more beds available for surgical procedures and other things to go on,’ said medical director Dr Peter Rabey.

‘Brock Ward is not being used as a Covid unit because we don’t need it. We’ve kept the seven-bedded area there, which can be reopened at the snap of a finger.’

During the second wave, 11 patients have been through the hospital from some 510 cases.

Currently there is one patient with Covid in the intensive care unit.

All care home residents who were moved there after cases were detected in three homes, were discharged at the end of last week,

The number of theatre procedures is still down compared to the usual 350 to 400 weekly appointments due to safety precautions, Dr Rabey said.

Operations with a risk of Covid aerosols require the highest level of precaution, which causes delays on top of testing or isolating patients where required to ensure safety.

Stage one of the exit from lockdown allowed for partners to attend antenatal scans and C-section surgeries.

‘As we get into stage two, whenever that may be, we’ll be hoping to ease further in a controlled, safe way to get more work done.’

With children of essential workers back at school, staffing levels have improved.

Vaccinations have prevented increased hospital visits by reducing the severity of infection.

Support is being prepared for patients with post-Covid syndrome, also known as long Covid, which occurs 12 weeks or later after an acute Covid infection.

Dr Rabey said not much is known about post-Covid syndrome yet but expert guidance will identify appropriate treatments and services as more information is gathered.

‘Please don’t delay coming to seek medical help if you need it.’

Patients will be looked after safely, primary care is available and both telephone and face-to-face consultations are available if needed.

‘Don’t store up trouble for later, get yourself looked after.’

. Anybody who suspects they may have post-Covid syndrome is advised to contact their GP for further support.

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