GSPCA looking to re-home 23 ducks

A FLOCK of ducks are in need of new homes.

GSPCA manager Steve Bryne holding a scoter duck, a rare breed that has recently been taken in by the animal shelter. (Picture by Cassidy Jones, 29786775)
GSPCA manager Steve Bryne holding a scoter duck, a rare breed that has recently been taken in by the animal shelter. (Picture by Cassidy Jones, 29786775)

GSPCA manager Steve Byrne said it had 23 ducks in need of re-homing.

‘They’re great little characters and can provide many hours of pleasure,’ he said.

‘We’d be delighted to re-home the ducks to anyone kind-hearted and duck-loving with big ponds.’

The shelter rescued 118 ducks and ducklings last year. But it tries to avoid bringing ducks in wherever possible.

‘We’re able to help the majority of those we do,’ he said.

‘Sometimes we unfortunately see ducks who have been attacked by predators, such as domestic pets and gulls, who require more care and attention.’

A selection of injured and sick ducks are not available for re-homing as they are being hand-reared by staff at the shelter.

Mallards and mallard-type ducks make up the current shelter population with one scoter duck recently requiring care.

‘That was quite unusual,’ said Mr Byrne.

‘Every year we have around 100 ducks to re-home.

‘Other birds we can simply release, but that isn’t possible with ducks.

‘These animals are not a big responsibility.

'We will need to talk to new owners about food and how to encourage ducks to learn to forage again so that they can become independent in the wild again. Often they will eventually just fly off on their own.’

He said ducks would tend to be re-homed into family groups.

‘They do better with friends.’

The number of ducks and ducklings being cared for at the GSPCA fluctuates weekly as birds get brought in and others get released.

‘We prefer to release ducks where we find them or ask anyone who has brought them in if they would like to take them back.’

The GSPCA chooses not to release ducklings until they are more than two months old.

‘Just having that safe-release site area is key, and the ducks will take care of any pondweed. They love doing what ducks do and just waddling about.’

Top Stories

More From The Guernsey Press

UK & International News