Charities starting to embrace contactless card donations

GENEROUS islanders and charities are embracing online and cashless donations – including using contactless payment machines.

Association of Guernsey Charities vice-president Peter Rose with two of the SumUp contactless card machines, which it loans free of charge to members to make collections. (Picture by Sophie Rabey, 30079070)
Association of Guernsey Charities vice-president Peter Rose with two of the SumUp contactless card machines, which it loans free of charge to members to make collections. (Picture by Sophie Rabey, 30079070)

Nearly £600,000 has been raised since the Association of Guernsey Charities created the giving.gg platform in 2016.

Some charities used the platform during lockdown to make up for a shortfall in funding.

‘The GSPCA used it for a Covid appeal and raised tens of thousands of pounds,' said AGC vice-president Peter Rose.

SumUp card machines were introduced in November 2020 as part of an AGC initiative to support local charities during the pandemic.

More than £60,000 has been

donated through the machines since they were first provided by the association.

The devices are loaned out, free of charge, so that charity organisers can collate donations at any events they put on, minimising the need for hand-to-hand cash exchanges.

The decision to purchase the SumUp devices came after some charities said they were having trouble receiving online donations.

There are now three devices available, two of which have been sponsored by Crimestoppers, which is a member charity.

‘The public have taken to it in droves and they’re really cost effective – they’re cheap to buy and really easy to use,’ said Mr Rose.’

Devices are given out on a first come, first served basis.

A charge of 1.69% on each transaction is taken by the provider, which is less than most other mainstream machines.

‘Others can be 3 to 4%, it’s the most cost-effective one.’

He added that many charities have gone on to purchase their own machine – they cost £100.

‘It is a way for them to test the water to see if it works for them,’ said Mr Rose.

Those wishing to borrow the machines are provided with a fact sheet which outlines the basic three-step instructions for how to use them.

Autism Guernsey recently used the devices at the Golden Guernsey Goat Trail auction, which raised £77,000.

Over the summer, Guernsey Cancer Support also used the devices to collect donations from the Cobo Balcony Gig crowds.

The Cheshire Home has also booked to use them for the annual Boxing Day dip.

‘If we get demand for more machines, we will get them,’ said Mr Rose.

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