Close shave for kitten that jumped into water feature

THE misadventures of Mister Mistoffelees landed him in cold water Friday morning after the seven-month-old kitten leapt into a water feature in St Peter Port that he could not get out of.

Seven-month-old Mister Mistoffelees was taken to the GSPCA on Friday morning after he leapt into a water feature in Doyle Road that he couldn’t escape from. He was reunited with his family by mid morning thanks to a microchip. (Picture supplied)
Seven-month-old Mister Mistoffelees was taken to the GSPCA on Friday morning after he leapt into a water feature in Doyle Road that he couldn’t escape from. He was reunited with his family by mid morning thanks to a microchip. (Picture supplied)

Just before 4am on Friday morning, an anonymous person rescued the adventurous ginger kitten from a water feature off Doyle Road.

Mister Mistoffelees was taken to the GSPCA and checked over carefully.

‘He was cold and wet, and looking a bit upset for himself, but he was in fine condition,’ said Steve Byrne, GSPCA manager.

Luckily, the young kitten had a microchip, and GSPCA staff were able to contact his owners.

By mid-morning he was safely back home with his family.

The kitten’s owner, Patrick Millar, said he was very grateful to both the GSPCA and the rescuer.

‘Thank you so much to everyone who helped Mister Mistoffelees. He’s one much-loved puss,’ said Mr Millar, a financial project manager.

Mr Millar said his cat was not the first to grapple with the water feature at the end of his clos.

A year ago, he said, another cat had drowned in the fountain after ending up in the water.

‘I will speak to the other neighbours on the road to see about measures we can take to prevent this in the future,’ he said.

‘Once an animal is in the water, they can’t get out. The walls are smooth all the way around, and there’s no way for them to clamber out.’

Mr Millar also stressed the importance of microchipping pets in case they get into trouble, like Mister Mistoffelees.

The GSPCA can microchip pets for £4.99, and they can offer helpful advice for lost and found pets.

n SEAL pup season is here, and the GSPCA has emphasised the importance of maintaining distance with pups and adults.

‘It is extremely important not to approach or get too close as this can often scare the mother away and certainly do not let your dogs approach pups or adults,’ the agency said.

Rough winter seas can often separate seal mothers from their pups, said GSPCA manager Steve Byrne. A healthy pup ‘looks like a big, stuffed maggot without a neck’, while a thin pup looks sleek with a visible neck like a healthy dog.

The GSPCA encouraged anyone who has spotted a seal, healthy or not, to call it so staff can be aware of its location and condition.

n DOMESTIC rabbits must be vaccinated to protect them from myxomatosis, said the GSPCA.

After close to record numbers of wild rabbits spotted locally this summer, a variant of the disease is spreading through wild rabbit population in the island, and GSPCA manager Steve Byrne said large numbers are dying of the illness.

The GSPCA has helped 183 domestic and wild rabbits since 1 September, 181 of which have had myxomatosis.

The virus poses a danger to unvaccinated rabbits, especially animals kept in outdoor enclosures.

It is a severe, usually fatal, viral disease.

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